Do you want to improve your memory? Your grades?

Are you worried about your memory? About getting older? About your risk of developing Alzheimer's?

This site, together with its companion site, About memory, offers hundreds of articles and research reports on improving your memory and learning, and how memory can falter. Mempowered focuses on user-friendly advice, while About memory collects and organizes the research, and provides articles of how memory and the brain work.

Keep up to date with new articles, the latest news reports, and website changes through my newsletters or feeds.

Book cover
Book cover
Book cover
Book cover
Book cover
book cover
Book cover
Book cover
Book cover
Book cover
Book cover

Recent Blog Posts

  • My Memory Journal: journal & guide to improving your memory
  • Make Your Own Memory Journal: digital version available for immediate download
  • Prices slashed on all Wayz Press memory and study ebooks, for the holiday period
  • New articles with tips on improving your sleep, and advice on building cognitive reserve

My Memory Journal

At the same time as a group of French parents and teachers have called for a two-week boycott of homework (despite the fact that homework is officially banned in French primary schools), and just after the British government scrapped homework guidelines, a large long-running British study came out in support of hom

I was listening to a podcast the other day. Two psychologists (Andrew Wilson and Sabrina Galonka) were being interviewed about embodied cognition, a topic I find particularly interesting.

I have previously reported on how gait and balance problems have been associated with white matter lesions, and walking speed and grip strength have been associated with dementia and stroke risk.

We all like simple solutions. However much we may believe we are ‘above’ black-&-white dichotomies, that of course we understand that every situation is complex, nevertheless we have a brain that can only think of a very very few things at once. So it's unsurprising that we are drawn to solutions that can be summed up simply, that can fit comfortably within the limitations of working memory.